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Gender & Society in the news

Livescience.com June 20, 2015 Water Fights and Grown-Up Talk: How Dads Do It Differently (Lyn Craig)

Researchers reporting in a 2006 issue of the journal Gender & Society analyzed time use by both mothers and fathers, finding that women tended to multitask — for instance cooking dinner while comforting a crying child — while dads were likelier to focus solely on their little ones. In part, that may be because women are doing the lion’s share of the drudgery, such as diaper duty and toilet scrubbing. But, regardless, men spent more of their kid time playing, talking, and engaging in educational and recreational activities, the study found.

Thefiscaltimes.Com June 12, 2015 Thinking Ahead Could Be Holding Women Back (Brooke Conroy Bass)

Different attitudes in how men and women prepare for their futures might be a factor contributing to the gender gap, a new study published in Gender & Society finds.

Phys.org June 11, 2015 Women more likely than men to worry about how career paths align with future parenthood (Brooke Conroy Bass) 

Women are more likely than men to think and worry about future parenthood, a Stanford scholar says.Brooke Conroy Bass, a Stanford sociology doctoral student, wrote in a new Gender & Society article that women also were more apt to downscale their career goals when thinking about their upcoming parenthood roles.

The Loop, May 21, 2015 It doesn’t pay to be a straight woman: The sad reality about Canadian workplaces (Sean Waite and Nicole Denier)

A recent study out of McGill University, which looked at “wage penalties” based on sexual orientation, pinpointed that gay men in relationships make five per cent less than heterosexual men; lesbians in relationships, nine per cent less. But despite biological sex, race, and sexual orientation, one group of people is persistently maligned: straight women. In all four groups — straight men and women and gay men and women — heterosexual women made the least money.

Global News, May 20, 2015 (Interview with Nicole Denier on the study she and Sean Waite conducted: Gay Pay for Straight Work: Mechanisms Generating Disadvantage)

Wed, May 20: A new study from McGill University says your sexual orientation affects how much you get paid.

Toronto Sun, May 20, 2015 Sexual Orientation Can Effect Pay (Sean Waite and Nicole Denier)

The study, Gay Pay for Straight Work, uses data from the 2006 census to show sexual orientation has a clear impact on pay.For men, being gay is detrimental, but for women, it’s can actually mean making more money.

Global News, May 19, 2015 Gay Men in Relationships Make Less Money Than Straight Men: Study (Sean Waite and Nicole Denier)

The largest wage gaps were found in the highest paid occupations, such as management and business. Researchers looked through Stats Canada census data from 2006 that examined a broad range of occupations from retail to construction.

CTV News, May 19, 2015 Gay Men Earn Less than Straight Men, Opposite for Women: McGill Study (Sean Waite and Nicole Denier)

Waite says he and Denier also considered using more recent data (like the 2011 National Household Survey), but opted to publish based on the last Census because of fewer potential issues with the quality of the data. The findings are consistent with similar studies done in other countries, he adds. “The other studies in the U.S., Europe and Australia find the same pattern: that gay men earn less and lesbians earn more than their heterosexual counterparts.” The study Gay Pay For Straight Work: Mechanisms Generating Disadvantage is published in the journal Gender & Society.

Le Journal de Montréal, May 19, 2015  Les hétérosexuels gagnent plus que les gais et lesbiennes (Sean Waite and Nicole Denier)

Les écarts sont davantage perceptibles dans des secteurs d’emplois comme la gestion, le commerce et la finance où les postes sont habituellement plus rémunérés. La différence est aussi plus marquée dans les entreprises privées. «L’écart a été éliminé, presque, dans le secteur public, mais on voit plus de résistance dans le secteur privé», a affirmé la chercheuse.Les résultats de ces travaux ont été publiés dans la revue scientifique Gender and Society.

McGill Press Releases, May 19, 2015: Sean Waite and Nicole Denier’s article Gay Pay for Straight Work: Mechanisms Generating Disadvantage here and here

Huffington Post, May 8, 2015: Only 6 American Men Identified as Stay-At-Home Dads in 1970s. Today, It is a Different Story

These are fathers who were laid off and can’t find jobs or who are disabled and physically cannot work. They’re typically lower-income and are even more likely to cling to outdated views on fatherhood, said Kramer. That’s certainly what Noelle Chesley found when researching stay-at-home fathers for a paper published in 2011 in the journal Gender & Society. Chesley, an associate professor of sociology at the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, conducted extensive interviews with 21 couples from the midwest, at a mix of income levels, where the father stayed home and the mother worked.

Education & Society, April 8, 2015: Latinas Achieve Autonomy through College

Women now outnumber men in college enrollment and degree achievement. In 2010 women attained 57% of bachelor’s degrees in the U.S. Latino/a degree attainment follows this trend. In 2009 women achieved 61% of bachelor’s degrees awarded to Hispanics. New research by Sarah Ovink explains this success by illustrating how gender and race/ethnicity combine to influence college choices.

Phy.Org, March 30, 2015: Race, Ethnicity, Gender, Family Income to be Studied as Metrics for STEM Success

She recently published an article in the journal Gender & Society that examines trends in Latinos’/Latinas’ postsecondary pathways and life course decisions over a two-year period. Ovink discusses this article in a podcast titled “They Always Call Me an Investment: Gendered Familism and Latino/a College Pathways.”

Reason, February 9, 2015: Flawed Narratives, Perfect Victims, and the Columbia Rape Allegations

Zeilinger also asserts that “some women do not even realize they have been abused,” citing a study in the journal Gender & Society which reports that teenage girls “frequently wrote off abuse” because they saw it as normal male behavior.

Mic, February 3, 2015: The Treatment of Emma Sulkowicz Proves We Still Have No Idea How To Talk About Rape

Meanwhile, some women do not even realize they have been abused. A recent study in the journal Gender & Society found, middle school and high school aged women frequently wrote off abuse because they “overwhelmingly described [it] as ‘normal stuff’ that ‘guys do.'”

New Republic, January 29, 2015: Don’t Blame Anti-Vaxxers for the Measles Outbreak: Blame American Culture

Consider sociologist Jennifer A. Reich’s 2014 article “Neoliberal Mothering and Vaccine Refusal: Imagined Gated Communities and the Privilege of Choice,” published in the journal Gender & Society.

Business Week, January 26, 2015: More Sorority Parties could Mean Less Campus Rape

The houses that host parties where women believe they’re more likely to be sexually assaulted tend to share several distinct characteristics, Lehigh University researchers found in a 1996 study published in Gender and Society.

New Republic, January 5, 2015: Study: Anti-Vaccination Supporters Practice “Neoliberal Mothering”

Dr. Jennifer Reich, a sociologist at the University of Colorado Denver, has been researching the anti-vaccination movement since 2007, seeking to understand the processes by which people come to reject vaccines. Over the past seven years, she has conducted in-depth interviews with parents who refuse mainstream vaccine recommendations, along with doctors, alternative healers, and public policymakers.

TransactRX, September 22, 2014: Reasons Parents Forgo Vaccines for Children Differ Among Income Levels

According to new research published in the journal Gender & Society, the reasons why parents may not vaccinate their children can differ depending on their income levels. When it comes to households within the higher income brackets, the reasons often have ties to class privilege. 

Infection Control Today, August 27, 2014: Researcher Finds Education, Income Disparity in Resons for Not Vaccinating

Published in Gender & Society, a top-ranked journal in Gender Studies and Sociology field, Reich’s research shows that unvaccinated or under-vaccinated children from higher income backgrounds, with parents who are higher educated, have parents who intentionally choose to refuse or delay vaccinations out of a belief that they are protecting their children. On the other hand, children from families with lower incomes and with less educated parents tend to be under-vaccinated because they lack access to resources.

Science 20, August 27, 2014: Wealthy, Liberal, Elites: Vaccine Refusal Linked to Expression of Privilege

Not all students returning to school this month will be up to date on their vaccinations and a new paper in Gender&Society by Jennifer Reich,a professor of Sociology from the University of Colorado Denver, correlates it to the class privilege of their mothers.

Science Daily, August 27, 2014: Expression of Privilege in Vaccine Refusal

Published in Gender & Society, a journal in Gender Studies and Sociology field, Reich’s research shows that unvaccinated or under-vaccinated children from higher income backgrounds, with parents who are higher educated, have parents who intentionally choose to refuse or delay vaccinations out of a belief that they are protecting their children.

UC Denver Newsroom, August 27, 2014: Expression of Privilege in Vaccine Refusal

 Science Newsline Medicine, August 27, 2014: Expression of Privilege in Vaccine Refusal

Jersey Tribune, August 27, 2014: Expression of Privilege in Vaccine Refusal

CSun Today, August 11, 2014: Prof’s Study Finds Homophobia Hinders Women in the Building Trades

For their study, “Gendered Homophobia and the Contradictions of Workplace Discrimination for Women in the Building Trades,” Denissen and Saguy interviewed 63 tradeswomen to examine how cultural meanings of sexual orientation — as well as gender presentation, race and body size — affected a woman’s ability to work in the construction industry.

Salon, July 29, 2014: Women Are Getting Smarter Faster Than Men

But culture clearly plays a big role in creating differences in cognition. Women have historically had fewer educational opportunities. And even when education levels are equal, women may face negative stereotypes. For instance, teachers tend to underrate women’s math abilities, even when they perform such skills just as well as men, according to a 2012 study published in the journal Gender & Society. And in more-egalitarian societies, there’s a smaller gap in mathematical abilities. …

With Good Reasons Radio, July 26, 2015: Uptalk on Jeopardy

“Uptalk” is that rising, questioning tone some people use when ending a statement. It’s becoming so common that Thomas Linneman (College of William and Mary) studied its use by contestants on the game show Jeopardy. He found women use it more than men, but male contestants often use “uptalk” after a woman competitor gets a wrong answer. And: Most of us think the best way to motivate is with rewards like money. But best-selling author Dan Pink says that’s a mistake. He says the secret to high performance and satisfaction is the deeply human need to direct our own lives, to create new things, and to better our world.

Pacific Standard: The Science of Society, July 1, 2014: Dude, You Need to Get Into Nursing

While there has been significant attention to recruiting women into STEM fields, what about the converse—recruiting men to female-dominated fields? My recent article in Gender & Society analyzes the recruitment strategies of key health care players, examining themes of masculinity in text, speech, and images.

The Third Wave, June 24, 2014: Homophobia Hinders Women’s Progress in Building Trades

Julie Lalonde chats with Professor Denissen about her research on gendered homophobia in the trades. 

Women’s E-News, June 21, 2014: Jeers and Cheers

Gender and sexual discrimination discourage women from joining building trades and other blue collar jobs, according to a study released June 17 by Sociologists for Women. Women make up 2 percent of the building trades work force, according to the study. Both heterosexual and lesbian tradeswomen are subject to homophobia because they contradict stereotypes about femininity and threaten their male colleagues’ masculinity, the study reports.

Thomson Reuters Foundation, June 23, 2014: Jeers and Cheers

The Next Deal, June 17, 2014: Actually, Miss USA Is Right: Self Defense Can Prevent Sexual Assault

According to sociologist Jocelyn Hollander, self-defense “fills the gap” between the current state of affairs and the time when rapists stop raping. Further, Hollander says, “self-defense training challenges the implication that women are inherently vulnerable and in need of protection – from bystanders, law enforcement, universities, and the state.”

UCLA Newsroom, June 17, 2014: Hazing, homophobia block women in building trade study finds

In a new study, UCLA sociologist Abigail Saguy and UCLA alumna Amy Denissen, now on faculty at California State University, Northridge, blame sexism, homophobia and plain old hazing play for keeping the share of women in the building trades to a paltry 2 percent. “Gendered Homophobia and the Contradictions of Workplace Discrimination for Women in the Building Trades” appears in the June 2014 issue of the scholarly journal Gender and Society.

Public Wealth Watch, May 29, 2014: Men Who Read Magazines That Objectify Women are Less Likely to Respect Sexual Boundaries

These disturbing attitudes are so deeply ingrained in our culture that objectification, sexual harassment, and abuse have become the ‘new normal’ among young women, according to a recent study. These types of sexual violence are so ubiquitous that they “appear to be part of the fabric of young women’s lives,” noted the study’s author, Dr. Heather Hlavka.

Everyday Feminism, May 24, 2014: Why Girls Today Think Sexual Harassment is Normal Stuff

The study, from the journal Gender & Society, built upon results from a 2011 survey where 56% of middle- and high-school girls and 40% of boys reported that they’d received aggressive sexual advances — pressure for a date or to have sex, or verbal harassment. Of those harassed, only 9% reported the incident.

Chris Woodside: Guilt, Goals, and Mom

Then out came some provocative books: Elisabeth Badinter’s argument that modern mothers are forced to live like throwbacks to the past (The Conflict: How Modern Motherhood Undermines the Status of Women). And Alison Pugh’s book on parents buying too much to show love (Longing and Belonging Parents, Children and Consumer Culture). Shwom also followed research by her Rutgers sociologist colleague Norah MacKendrick, on mothers who control consumption, but for personal reasons: they want to keep chemicals away from their children.

The Green Mama, May 11, 2014: How To Stop Blaming Mothers & Keep Our Children Safe: Lessons Learned From Growing Up Poor

Thus, when the study “More Work for Mother: Chemical Body Burdens as a Maternal Responsibility” crossed my desk this week, I knew it was the most important study I had seen all year. Not because it told me anything new, but because it began to quantify something so essential it is at the heart of human health. Okay, I know, those are big, grand words, but bear with me…

Upworthy, May 9, 2014: I Don’t Know What’s Worse: Why Women Use ‘Uptalk’ Or Why Men Do. Kinda Thinking It’s the Latter?

Using 5,000 “Jeopardy” contestants as test subjects, researchers uncovered an interesting trend? It’s called “uptalk”? And while they observed both men and women speaking in uptalk, the difference in which gender used it more and why is actually fairly disappointing? Right? Right.

Jersey Tribune, May 8, 2014: One More Thing for Mom to Manage: Children’s Exposure to Environmental Chemicals

Women, who do most of a family’s shopping and day-to-day management, have quietly and uncomplainingly taken on yet another task: managing their children’s exposure to potentially harmful environmental chemicals.Norah MacKendrick, assistant professor of sociology in Rutgers’ School of Arts and Sciences, examines this trend in a new study published recently in the journal Gender and Society.

Medical Express, May 8, 2014: Managing Children’s Exposure to Environmental Chemicals

Rutgers Today, May 6, 2014: One More Thing for Mom to Manage: Children’s Exposure to Environmental Chemicals

Health Medicine Network: Managing Children’s Exposure to Environmental Chemicals

Energy Times: Moms See Toxins in Children as Their Own Burden

Norah MacKendrick, PhD, of Rutgers University conducted in-depth interviews with 23 women in Toronto who were either pregnant or had at least one child under 12 years of age. Fifteen had annual household incomes that exceeded $50,000, two had incomes between $25,000 and $49,999 and eight were in households earning less than $25,000. Nineteen of the women were living with partners.

WIRED, May 2014: The Rise of Uptalk: Questioning a Verbal Tic

Some people make statements? But end them as if they’re questions? That’s “uptalk,” and Thomas Linneman, a sociologist at William and Mary, thought that he might figure out how people use it in a place where the answers are all questions: Jeopardy! Linneman watched 100 epsiodes, recording whether contestants’ answers ended in a rising or falling pitch.

GQ, May 2014: When Did We All Start Talking Like Valley Guys?

Two recent studies confirm this. The first, conducted by sociologist Thomas J. Linneman, found a startling incidence among male contestants on Jeopardy!, especially when ringing in to gently correct an answer by a female contestant. (“What is…a mildly sexist form of public chivalry?”)

Business Week, April 24, 2014: What Does How You Talk Have to Do with How You Get Ahead?

“I first noticed the trend among my very smart undergraduate female students,” says Thomas Linneman, a sociology professor at the College of William & Mary in Virginia. “They’d get up in front of the class and say, ‘These are my results? Here’s what I found?’ It was out of control.” Deeply annoyed, Linneman launched an uptalk study.

Press TV, April 22, 2014: Young Women in US see Sexual Assault as Normal, Report Finds

How does a crime committed against nearly 238,000 women a year go unreported 60 percent of the time? According to a new report, many victims of sexual assault may not actually see themselves as victims.

The Huffington Post, April 15, 2014: Young Women See Sexual Violence as Normal, Report Finds

The Society Pages, April 21, 2014: Young Girls Consider Sexual Violence Normal

Good sociological research illuminates how individuals in society interact with social institutions and with one another. Sometimes, this research can uncover some of the feel-good aspects of social life. Other times, it can leave you despairing for humanity and raging against social structures.

MSNBC, April 20, 2014: Troubling Behavior Some Girls See As ‘Normal’

A new study suggests the reason so few young women report sexual violence and harassment because they view this type of behavior as “normal.” Heather Hlavka, author of the report “Normalizing Sexual Violence” joins “MHP” to discuss.

WCPO Cincinnati, April 18, 2014: Study: Girls View Sexual Violence As Normal

New research from the journal Gender & Society shows girls view sexual violence as a normal part of life, which might point to why girls and young women rarely report incidents of abuse.

Daily Collegian, April 17, 2014: Sexual Violence Is Not ‘Normal’

We have known for a long time now that girls and women often don’t report incidents of any type of sexual assault for a variety of reasons. Perhaps one of the saddest reasons, though, has been documented in a new study, “Normalizing Sexual Violence: Young Women Account for Harassment and Abuse,” to be published in an upcoming issue of “Gender & Society.”

All Voices, April 17, 2014: Girls in US View Sexual Assault as ‘Normal’ Part of Daily Life, Study Finds

A new study in America has found that most girls and young women do not report incidents of sexual assault against them because they do not feel victimized.

KSHB, April 17, 2014: Study: Girls View Sexual Violence As Normal

New research from the journal Gender & Society shows girls view sexual violence as a normal part of life, which might point to why girls and young women rarely report incidents of abuse.

IBN Live, April 17, 2014: Young Women See Sexual Assault as Normal: US Study

Many girls who are sexually assaulted may not see themselves as victims, according to a new US study that found most young women do not report acts of sexual violence because they regard them as ‘normal’.

The Malaysian, April 17, 2014: Study Shows Young Women See Sexual Assault As ‘Normal’

Hindustan Times, April 16, 2014: Young Women See Sexual Assault as Normal, Something That Happens to Everyone

Business Standard, April 16, 2014: Young Women see Sexual Assault as Normal: US Study

Financial Express, April 16, 2014: Young Women See Sexual Assault As Normal: US Study

Deccan Herald, April 16, 2014: Young Women See Sexual Assault As Normal: US Study

American Bazaar, April 16, 2014: Most Young Women, Girls in US Don’t Report Sexual Abuse, Believe It Is Part of Life

WASHINGTON, DC: Girls and young women in the US do not report sexual abuse because they do not feel victimized, according to the alarming findings of a new study, which reveals that most female teenagers and young adults believe that sexual assault is just a normal facet of everyday life, and nothing to get overly worked-up about.

Huffington Post Live, April 16, 2014: Why Many Women May Not See Themselves As Victims

A new report found that not only do many young women see sexual assault as normal, they may not actually see themselves as victims when sexual assault occurs. We find out why.

Cosmopolitan, April 16, 2014: Young Girls Think Sexual Assault Is OK

An upcoming issue of Gender & Society features the study Normalizing Sexual Violence: Young Women Account for Harassment and Abuse, where 100 girls and young women between the ages of three and seventeen were interviewed by the Children’s Advocacy Centre.

Cosmopolitan, April 16, 2014: Young Women Think Sexual Assault is Normal

Clutch Magazine, April 15, 2014: New Study: Young Women View Incidents of Sexual Assault as Normal

A study conducted by Marquette University offers insight into why many victims don’t report incidents of sexual assault. Researchers analyzed interviews with 100 young people between the ages of 3 and 17 and found young women fear being labeled a “whore,” believe men can’t help themselves, and view many inappropriate acts as “normal.”

WGNO, April 15, 2014: Young Women See Sexual Violence as ‘Normal,’ Study Says

According to a new study, girls and young women rarely report sexual abuse because they think it’s “normal.”

Mommyish, April 15, 2014: Report Finds Girls View Sexual Assault As Normal Behavior And This Is Not Okay

Rape culture is certainly taking it’s toll – and the results are harrowing. A new report on the normalization of sexual violence among young girls and women shows just how often girls view sexual assault as “normal” behavior. We are failing these girls. Big time.

The Week, April 15, 2014: Study: Teen Girls See Sexual Violence as Normal, Unavoidable

A recent study at Marquette University proves once again how prevalent slut-shaming is among middle and high schoolers. Researchers questioned young women between the ages of three and 17 about their experiences with sexual harassment and violence, and the results were truly disheartening.

MSNBC, April 15, 2014: Study: Many Young Girls View Sexual Violence as ‘Normal Stuff’

The eye-popping results, from a study on Normalizing Sexual Violence set to appear in the next issue of Gender & Society, exposes how objectification, sexual harassment and abuse are viewed as everyday experiences for many young women.

MSNBC, April 15, 2014: Study: Many Young Girls View Sexual Violence as ‘Normal Stuff’

The Frisky, April 15, 2014: RIP Society: Study Finds That Young Girls See Sexual Violence As Normal

Today in Egregious Discoveries About Humanity, a study has found that a big reason women rarely report sexual violence is because they view it as “normal.” The study, which will be published in Gender & Society, reviewed forensic interviews with 100 kids who may have been sexually assaulted. The interviews were conducted by the Children’s Advocacy Center, and the subjects’ ages ranged from 3-17.

RYOT, April 15, 2014: Disturbing Study Finds Women Actually Think Sexual Violence is Normal

A study to be published in Gender & Society finds that young women assume being harassed, assaulted and abused is simply something everyone experiences.

New Republic, April 15, 2014: Slut-Shaming: New Study Shows Teens Learn Sexual Violence is Okay

A new study called “Normalizing Sexual Violence,” to be published in the next issue of the journal Gender & Society, suggests teenagers are still growing up with the perception that rape and harassment are just “normal stuff” that “guys do.”

Think Progress, April 15, 2014: For Young Women, Sexual Violence is the New Normal

Most young women assume that being harassed, assaulted, and abused is simply something that everyone experiences, according to the results from a forthcoming study that will be published in the next issue of the journal Gender & Society. The perception that gender-based violence is normal dissuades most victims from reporting those crimes.

Care 2, April 15, 2014: For Young Women, Sexual Violence is the New Normal

Public Health Watch, April 15, 2014: Sexual Assault: The New Normal Among Young Women?

New evidence from a study published in the journal Gender & Society helps explain what women’s advocates have argued for years – that women report abuse at much lower rates than it actually occurs. According to the Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network (RAINN), 44% of victims are under the age of 18, and 60% of sexual assaults are not reported to police. Statistics from the Department of Justice are even more dire: Among college-age women, as many as 95% of sexual assaults go unreported.

Jezebel, April 14, 2014: Depressing/Unsuprising Study: Girls View Sexual Violence as Normal

A new study published in a forthcoming issue of Gender & Society finds that girls and young women rarely report incidents of sexual violence because they view such incidents as “normal.” These findings are at once supremely depressing and remarkably unsurprising.

Salon, April 14, 2014: Report: Many girls view sexual assault as normal behavior

According to sociologist Heather Hlavka, many of the young people she interviewed viewed these incidents as a normal part of life. One interview subject told researchers, “They grab you, touch your butt and try to, like, touch you in the front, and run away, but it’s okay, I mean … I never think it’s a big thing because they do it to everyone.”

Feministing, April 10, 2014: Daily Feminist Cheat Sheet

A new study reveals that girls tend to view sexual harassment and violence as normal.

Women’s Health, April 4, 2014: You’re a Feminist… So Why Don’t You Date Like One?

But instead of taking charge in our dating lives, we’re still waiting for guys to ask us out, expecting them to pick up the check, and letting them decide the level of commitment, according to a new study in the journal Gender & Society.

Dating Advice, March 28, 2014: Women Want a Balance of Egalitarian and Traditional Relationships

However, new research, which was conducted by New York University doctoral candidate in sociology Ellen Lamont, is challenging the way many women still seemingly accept certain elements of “the man’s role” both in terms of dating and marriage.

Washington Square News, March 13, 2014: NYU Study Find Women Yearn for Relationships to Become more Egalitarian

A study exploring modern views on gender equality in dating released on March 6 finds that while women want egalitarian relationships with men, they do not necessarily reject traditional dating rituals.

New York University, March 6, 2014: Women Pursue Equal Relationships, Face Social Pressures, NYU Study Finds

New norms about gender equality and women’s autonomy now compete with more traditional dating norms, creating a contradiction for women as they seek to reconcile conflicting sets of behavioral rules,” explains Lamont, a doctoral candidate in NYU’s Department of Sociology. “It is clear that notions of gender equality need to be extended to courtship in order to ensure they are instilled in marriage and other areas of life.” Her findings, which appear in the journal Gender & Society, are based on interviews with 38 female college graduates. The average age of the respondents was 31.

Health Canal, March 7, 2014

Mother Jones, March 3, 2014: Pregnant? Your Boss May Have It In For You

Employers who illegally fire workers for being pregnant often attempt to skirt discrimination laws by smearing the employees as tardy, poor performers, or by chalking up their termination to company restructuring—even in cases where worse-performing employees, who were not pregnant, were allowed to remain on staff, and “company restructuring” turned out to be code for replacing pregnant workers. That’s according to a new study by sociology professor Reginald Byron of Southwestern University in Texas and Vincent Roscigno, a professor at Ohio State University. Their research, which will be published in the June 2014 issue of Gender & Society, is a major investigation into the phony justifications that employers who discriminated against pregnant workers gave to employees before firing them.

Not Exactly the News, March 3, 2014

News Sprocket, March 3, 2014

Tesettur Giyim Trend, March 3, 2014

Business News Daily, February 25, 2014: Employers Still Finding ‘Legal’ Excuses to Fire Pregnant Women

Despite anti-discrimination laws, some employers are still finding ways to cut ties with their pregnant employees, new research finds. A study in the journal Gender and Society discovered that to get around the Pregnancy Discrimination Act of 1978 — a law that prohibits employers from firing a woman just because she is pregnant — employers vilify pregnant women as poor performers and tardy employees.

Southwestern Newsroom, February 17, 2014: Pregnancy and the Firing Line

The Pregnancy Discrimination Act of 1978 makes it illegal for woman to be fired just because they are pregnant.  But that doesn’t stop it from happening, according to new research by Reginald Byron, assistant professor of sociology at Southwestern University and Vincent Roscigno, a Distinguished Professor of Arts and Science at The Ohio State University.

Science Daily, February 21, 2014

Huffington Post, February 12, 2014: Taking the ‘Care’ Out of Care Work? Men in Nursing

So, recruiting more men into nursing or more women into astrophysics is difficult work because it challenges a strong cultural bias against their entry. Marci Cottingham‘s new research in Gender & Society — “Recruiting Men, Constructing Manhood: How Health Care Organizations Mobilize Masculinities as Nursing Recruitment Strategy” — addresses this issue with a unique study analyzing recruitment materials aimed at bringing more men into nursing.

National Public Radio, February 11, 2014: Study: Stereotypes Drive Perceptions of Race

Governments, schools and companies keep track of your race. The statistics are used to track the proportion of blacks and whites who graduate from school. They tell us how many people identify themselves as Native American or Asian. They help us measure health disparities. But there’s a problem with all those statistics — and the deeper way we think about race.

Fathers, Work and Family, January 2014: Expert perspectives: Erin Rehel on Fatherhood, masculinity and paternity leave

My research examines the connection between fatherhood, work, social policy, and shifting ideals of masculinity in the United States and Canada. I conducted 85 interviews with fathers and their partners. I find that fathers today draw think differently about masculinity and fatherhood, but there are societal and workplace barriers that force many dads to fall back into less involved parenting roles. In this particular study, “When Dad Stays Home Too: Paternity Leave, Gender, and Parenting,” (forthcoming in Gender & Society), I argue that when fathers experience the transition to parenthood in ways similar to mothers, through formal or informal paternity leave, they come to think about and do parenting in ways that are similar to mothers.

The Smithsonian Magazine, January 2014: What can Jeopardy tell us about uptalk?

Linneman focused his study on 100 episodes of Jeopardy!, which he watched mostly in the evenings, on his couch with his dog at his feet. As the episodes played, he noted when contestants ended their answers with a rising intonation (uptalk) versus a flat or downward one, and he also documented the contestants’ demographic details, how far ahead or behind they were in the game, and whether they were supplying a first answer or correcting an opponent.

The Almagest, December 24, 2013: Transgender controversies can lead to ‘gender panic,’ study finds

When New York City moved in 2006 to make it easier for transgender people to revise the gender on their birth certificates, the proposal was widely expected to pass. But the anti-discrimination measure failed, in part because of public opposition to removing the requirement that individuals have genital surgery before claiming a different gender. “The backlash was intense,” said Kristen Schilt, assistant professor of sociology at the University of Chicago. “There was such a fervor over taking the surgery requirement out, a sense of, ‘Absolutely not. There’s going to be chaos.’” Schilt calls this public reaction “gender panic,” a concept that she and co-author Laurel Westbrook explore in their study, “Doing Gender, Determining Gender,” published in the issue of the journal Gender and Society

Phys.org, November 5, 2013

Red Orbit, November 5, 2013

Science Daily, November 4, 2013

The New York Times, December 23, 2013: Overturning the myth of valley girl speak

In a study published last year in Gender and Society, he found that, “Men use uptalk more when surrounded by women contestants, and when correcting a woman contestant after she makes an incorrect response.” He concluded, “The more successful a man is, the less likely he is to use uptalk; the more successful a woman is, the more likely she is to use uptalk.”

TIME Magazine, December 10, 2013: Men’s fertility should be scrutinized too: A new study suggests a father’s diet influences birth defects

Future fathers of the world, eat your spinach salads. That’s the message behind a new study in Nature Communications suggesting that what fathers eat before conceiving a baby might play an important role in whether their children suffer from birth defects. Researchers from McGill University in MontrealCanada, compared the health of mice from fathers that had a sufficient level of vitamin B9, also known as folate, in their diet to dads that had a deficit. (Here’s a list of folate-rich foods for humans.) “We were very surprised to see that there was an almost 30% increase in birth defects in the offspring sired by fathers whose levels of folates were insufficient,” says Romain Lambrot, a reproductive biologist in McGill’s Animal Sciences Department. “We saw some pretty severe skeletal abnormalities that included both cranio-facial and spinal deformities.”

Health News Digest, December 3, 2013: How men factor into the reproductive equation

Researchers know a lot about how women’s bodily health affects their fertility, but less is known about how men’s health affects reproductive outcomes. Yale researcher Rene Almeling and co-author Miranda R. Waggoner of Princeton address this discrepancy in a study published today in the journal Gender & Society.

Health Canal, March 12, 2013

The Journal Gazette.net, December 9, 2013: Men’s preconception behavior matters for healthy baby

“Men and women contribute equally to reproduction.” That’s a statement in a new paper in the journal Gender and Society about how men’s role in making babies has been culturally diminished. It is a painfully obvious sentence, and yet it bears repeating because we’re so fixated on women’s prenatal and preconception behavior and health. For example, the most emailed article on the New York Times website as I type is about how women’s eating habits affect their babies in the womb. But we barely ever mention how male behavior can affect sperm quality.

The Stanley News and Press, December 5, 2013

Slate.fr, December 5, 2013

Slate, December 3, 2013

The Sentinel Echo, December 3, 2013

Chicago Tribune, December 3, 2013

Phys.Org, October 28, 2013: Study on gender: Who counts as a man and who counts as a woman

Gender is no longer determined solely by biological factors, according to a new study by a Grand Valley State University researcher whose article, “Doing Gender, Determining Gender: Transgender People, Gender Panics, and the Maintenance of the Sex/Gender/Sexuality System,” was recently published in Gender & Society.

e! Science News, October 28, 2013

Forbes, August 6, 2013: Money and marriage: Who’s earning it vs. who’s in charge of spending it

Of course, earning money is not the same as controlling income, and some researchers argue that it’s key for couples to look not at who’s earning the money but who’s in charge of spending it, and how it’s spent. Research published in a 2006 issue of Gender & Society found that women’s increasing labor force participation does not necessarily translate into increased access to money, and that issues can arise among couples in which one half controls the income more than the other.

Madame Noire, June 15, 2013: Can you change your race? New study looks at societal factors and racial assumptions

Racial associations are made almost unconsciously. And a new study from Gender & Society found that observers take into account a wide range of factors in determining the race of people they see, including what they know about someone’s income, home address or marital status.

Gender News, June 5, 2013: Social status can change the way we ‘see’ a perons’ race, according to research by Aliya Saperstein

Saperstein and her co-author Andrew Penner, a sociologist at UC Irvine, draw on a survey of 12,686 young men and women tracked throughout their adult lives, beginning in 1979. Every year, survey interviewers met with each person. At the end of the interview, they racially classified the respondent as black, white, or other. Surprisingly, the interviewer’s racial classification didn’t always match the way the person self-identified. What’s more, it didn’t always match the way the same interviewer had classified that same person in a previous year.

Boston Review, June 3, 2013: Can losing your job make you black?

The studies we have conducted show that while race shapes our life experiences, our life experiences also shape our race. Race and perceptions of difference are not only a cause of inequality, they also result from inequality. Americans’ racial stereotypes have become self-fulfilling prophecies: the mental images Americans have of criminals and welfare queens, or college grads and suburbanites, can literally affect how we see each other.

Mail Online, May 2, 2013: Mothers not welcome at macho workplaces

The research, published in the journal Gender & Society, found that in male-dominated occupations, employees were more likely to work over 50 hours than in balanced fields or female-dominated fields. Though these long working weeks would certainly be hard to juggle with a young child, yet in professions where mothers were surrounded by mainly women or an equal mix of the sexes, the effect was not seen.

The British Psychological Society, April 30, 2013: Mums stay away from macho workplace

Mothers are less likely than other employees to remain in jobs that are male-dominated. This is the suggestion of new research published in the journal Gender & Society, which found mums are also less inclined to want to stay in positions where they are required to put in long hours. Investigators from Indiana University (IU) Bloomington used data from national longitudinal household research the Survey of Income and Program Participation – which considered 382 different occupations, 173 of which were deemed to be male-dominated. Youngjoo Cha, Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology at IU Bloomington, said: “Mothers were 52 per cent more likely than other women to leave their jobs if they were working a 50-hour week or more, but only in occupations dominated by men.”

Arizona Daily Star, April 28, 2013: Unconscious bias a threat in academic hiring, university of Arizona official warns

Another study, this one published last fall in the sociology journal “Gender and Society,” examined why women gravitate toward biology rather than choose the so-called “hard” sciences of physics and astronomy. Among more than 2,500 biologists, physicists and astronomers in the nation’s top science programs, women were far more likely than men to choose the reason: “Women are discriminated against more in physics than biology.” The low numbers of women in academic physics means it’s hard for them to make inroads, said study author Elaine Howard Ecklund, associate professor of sociology at Rice University.

The Indian Express, April 27, 2013: Moms more likely to leave male-dominated jobs with long hours

The study, published in the journal Gender & Society, reveals how overwork contributes to occupational segregation and stalls efforts to narrow the gender gap in white-collar workplaces.

The Atlantic, April 26, 2013: Long hours push working mothers out of high-level jobs

Youngjoo Cha, an assistant professor of sociology at Indiana University, published research in the latest issue of Gender & Society finding that professions that have average working hours have plenty of men and childless women, but very few working mothers.

Business News Daily, April 25, 2013: The thing driving women from many high-paying careers

Moms suffer more than anyone else from working overtime in jobs predominately filled with men, new research shows. The Indiana University (IU) study revealed that working mothers are more likely than other employees to leave jobs in male-dominated fields because of the long hours they are expected to work.

In These Times, April 24, 2013: Overworking women: how long hours lead to gender-segregated jobs

The long hours Americans put in at work aren’t just stressing us out, according to a new study by Dr. Youngjoo Cha of Indiana University—they’re also helping keep our workplaces gender-segregated. The study, “Overwork and the Persistence of Gender Segregation in Occupations,” published in the journal Gender & Society, found that “[T]he norm of overwork in male-dominated workplaces and the gender beliefs operating in the family combine to reinforce gender segregation of the labor market.”

The Medical Daily, April 24, 2013: Mothers more likely to exit male-dominated professions requiring long hours than men or other women

Her study, “Overwork and the Persistence of Gender Segregation in Occupations,” published in the April issue of Gender & Society, analyzed data collected from the Survey of Income and Program Participation conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau. The survey includes 382 occupations, 173 of which are considered male-dominated in that men made up 70 percent or more of the workforce. “Many of these are lucrative fields, such as law, medicine, finance and engineering,” says Cha.

The Paramus Post, April 22, 2013: Leaning in is not the same for everyone

A new Gender & Society study reveals how overwork contributes to the “stalled gender revolution” and helps to explain why there isn’t more equality in the workplace, despite the popular belief that equality between men and women is a social good. The new study gives hints, too, about the challenges women face in order to “lean in” and get ahead.

Girl w/ Pen!, April 22, 2013: Nice work: Lean in too much? See new study on gender and overwork

Research released this month in the journal Gender & Society confirms that “overwork”— working more than 50 hours per week—has become part of the job for many Americans, though with different effects for men and women. Over the past thirty years, hours at work—especially in higher income jobs—have increased, and over one-third of men and nearly one-fifth of women in professions work more than a 50-hour week.

The Michigan Chronicle, March 28, 2013: The college grad gender gap

That’s according to a new study, “Gender, Debt, and Dropping Out of College,” published in a recent issue of the journal Gender & Society. The researchers, three professors from Ohio State University and Pacific Lutheran University, analyzed data from a national longitudinal study of youth from 1997 to 2011, funded by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, that included interviews with about 9,000 men and women in their 20s.

CNN Money, March 27, 2013

Inequality By (Interior) Design, March 14, 2013: Why more lesbians (might) live in rural communities than gay men

Emily Kazyak’s research on gay men and lesbians in rural communities (see here and here, and here for a report on her work) cites work arguing that “gay men are more likely to live in urban areas than are lesbian couples… suggesting that gender might matter for how sexual minorities experience rural areas” (here: 826).  Kazyak’s work highlights differences in rural and urban gender performances, but also of systems of evaluation by which gender performances are read and assessed.  The basic argument is that, “[A]cceptance for rural sexual minorities is gendered” (here: 831).

Girl w/ Pen!, March 7, 2013: Nice work: Cost shifting in the news and women’s graduation rates

However, a new study“Gender, Debt, and Dropping Out of College,” released in February in the journal Gender & Society, suggests quite a different reason for men’s dropout rates: men are less willing to tolerate the high levels of debt that are increasingly needed to complete a college education—on average, men tolerate $2,000 less educational debt than women do.

UWeekly, March 6, 2013: Women more dependent on degrees than men, study says

The study looked at data from 3,676 young Americans who took part in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 when they were between 13 and 17 years old. Then from 2010-2011 the same people were resurveyed while they were between 25 and 31 years old to examine student loans they took out each year and how much they owed on their overall student loans. Randy Hodson, an OSU professor of sociology, and Laura McCloud, assistant professor of sociology at Pacific Lutheran University also conducted the study with Dwyer. Their results appeared in the February 2013 issue of the journal Gender & Society.

Deccan Herald, February 26, 2013: Women benefit more from education loans than men

The research findings showed that, on average, taking out loans actually makes graduation more likely for all students. But at a certain point – which is about USD 2,000 lower for men than for women – debt has diminishing returns and becomes less effective at boosting chances of graduation. One reason loans help women more may be tied to job prospects for college dropouts – which are much better for men than for women, researchers said. “At least early in their careers, women suffer more than men if they don’t have a college degree,” said Rachel Dwyer, co-author of the study and associate professor of sociology at Ohio State University.

The Chronicle of Higher Education, February 25, 2013: High debt loads may deter men from graduating, research finds

For decades, educators and policy makers have sought explanations for why more men than women drop out of college. An article published this month in the journal Gender & Society offers a new theory: Men are more averse than are women to student-loan debt, and may be swayed by their perceived ability to make a decent living without a college degree.

The Chronicle Herald, February 24, 2013: Criticisms of the feminine mystique abound

In a new round-table in the journal Gender and Society, Coontz acknowledges that it is not known how many readers of The Feminine Mystique became politically active, or how many second-wave feminist leaders had even read the book. Indeed, Friedan was hardly without her critics in the movement, who blasted what they saw as her myopic focus on educated white women or her sometimes over-the-top language, whether she was comparing suburbia to “a comfortable concentration camp” or warning the National Organization for Women, which she helped found in 1966, against an encroaching lesbian “menace.”

U.S. News & World Report, February 24, 2013: Women take out more student loans, face more debt than men

Researchers from Ohio State University (OSU) looked at data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth.  This study interviewed 3,676 individuals who were between the ages of 13 and 17 in 1997 and then followed up annually though 2010 and 2011, when the participants were between the ages of 25 and 31. The researchers gathered information about student loans and graduation rates, and then organized the results by gender. In doing so, they found that women were more likely to take out loans than men, as 40% of females applied for and received loans compared to only 34% of males.

The Hindu Business Line, February 23, 2013: Education loans benefit women more than men: study

“At least early in their careers, women suffer more than men if they don’t have a college degree,” said Rachel Dwyer, co-author of the study and associate professor of sociology at Ohio State University. “Women will go deeper in debt to finance college because they need the degree more than men if they want to earn a good living. Men will drop out at lower levels of debt,” Dwyer said in a statement. Dwyer conducted the study with Randy Hodson, professor of sociology at Ohio State University, and Laura McCloud, assistant professor of sociology at Pacific Lutheran University. Their study was published in the journal Gender and Society.

The Wall Street Journal, February 22, 2013: Why men are more likely to drop out 

That dynamic exists for all students, but not equally. According to a new paper in the journal Gender & Society, men are more likely than women to leave school rather than take on more loans. Women are more likely to finish their degrees, even if that means graduating with a higher debt burden. The research suggests that student debt may help explain a significant but poorly understood trend in recent years: Women are not only enrolling in college at higher rates than men, they’re also more likely to graduate.

Business News Daily, February 22, 2013: How student loans can help students

“At least early in their careers, women suffer more than men if they don’t have a college degree,” said Rachel Dwyer, co-author of the study and associate professor of sociology at Ohio State University. “Women will go deeper in debt to finance college because they need the degree more than men if they want to earn a good living. Men will drop out at lower levels of debt.”

Education Week, February 22, 2013: Women’s college success: A look behind the gender gap

It may have something to do with men’s lower tolerance for debt and their ability to get good jobs with a college degree, according to a new article in the academic journal, Gender and Society“Gender, Debt, and Dropping Out of College,” by Rachel Dwyer, Randy Hodson, and Laura McCloud found that women’s comfort level for taking on debt for college was about $2,000 higher than men’s threshold. After borrowing about $12,500, taking on more debt reduced men’s likelihood of finishing a degree while women were more likely to complete college with higher levels of debt.

Red Orbit, February 22, 2013: Women benefit from students loans more than men when reaching graduation

“At least early in their careers, women suffer more than men if they don’t have a college degree,” said Rachel Dwyer, co-author of the study and associate professor of sociology at Ohio State University. “Women will go deeper in debt to finance college because they need the degree more than men if they want to earn a good living. Men will drop out at lower levels of debt.” Dwyer conducted the study with Randy Hodson, professor of sociology at Ohio State University, and Laura McCloud, assistant professor of sociology at Pacific Lutheran University. Their results appear in the February 2013 issue of the journal Gender & Society.

Center for Economic and Policy Research, February 21, 2013: Gender, debt, and dropping out

The latest issue of the peer-reviewed academic journal, Gender and Society, has an excellent paper by Rachel Dwyer, Randy Hodson, and Laura McCloud on “Gender, Debt, and Dropping Out of College” (which is, unfortunately, behind a paywall).

Jezebel, February 21, 2013: Men are more likely to drop out of college than women, because they can afford it

Why do so many more men than women drop out of college? According to a new study, it’s not because of video game addiction or other commonly-decried symptoms of male slackerdom. Rather, according to a new study in the journal Gender and Society, men are much less willing to take on significant debt to finance their education.

Phys Org, February 21, 2013: Student loans help women more than men in reaching graduation

Dwyer conducted the study with Randy Hodson, professor of sociology at Ohio State University, and Laura McCloud, assistant professor of sociology at Pacific Lutheran University. Their results appear in the February 2013 issue of the journal Gender & Society. Data for the study came from 3,676 young Americans who participated in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997. 

Science Daily, February 21, 2013: Student loans help women more than men in reaching graduation

“At least early in their careers, women suffer more than men if they don’t have a college degree,” said Rachel Dwyer, co-author of the study and associate professor of sociology at Ohio State University. “Women will go deeper in debt to finance college because they need the degree more than men if they want to earn a good living. Men will drop out at lower levels of debt.” Dwyer conducted the study with Randy Hodson, professor of sociology at Ohio State University, and Laura McCloud, assistant professor of sociology at Pacific Lutheran University. Their results appear in the February 2013 issue of the journal Gender & Society.

The Boston Globe, February 20, 2013: ‘Uptalk’: How men and women use it differently

A new study sheds light on these uptalk gender differences by consulting an innovative data source: contestant responses on the quiz show Jeopardy!. Thomas Linneman, a sociologist at William and Mary, recorded 100 episodes of Jeopardy! and analyzed 5,473 responses given during those shows. Linneman found that, overall, contestants used uptalk 37 percent of the time, but that rates of uptalk varied considerably depending on the context: whether the contestant was a man or a woman, whether their answer was correct or not, and whether they were leading or behind in the game at the time they gave their answer.

The New York Times, February 18, 2013: Criticisms of a classic abound 

In a new round table in the journal Gender and Society, Ms. Coontz acknowledges that it is not known how many readers of “The Feminine Mystique” became politically active, or how many second-wave feminist leaders had even read the book. Indeed, Friedan was hardly without her critics in the movement, who blasted what they saw as her myopic focus on educated white women or her sometimes over-the-top language, whether she was comparing suburbia to “a comfortable concentration camp” or warning the National Organization for Women, which she help found in 1966, against an encroaching lesbian “menace.”

The Paramus Post, February 6, 2013: Gender in ‘Jeopardy!’: Uptalk isn’t just for valley girls?

He didn’t provide an answer in question format, but The College of William & Mary’s Thomas Linneman told us how women and men both use uptalk in his new study, “Gender in Jeopardy! Intonation Variation on a Television Game Show,” in the February issue of the journal Gender & Society.

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